Messages from Overseas Including International Organizations

The following authoritative international organizations have issued the statements about traveling to Japan.

(1)International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)

Representing the five relevant United Nations specialized agencies, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) issued the following statement titled “There are no restrictions on travel to Japan” on 18 March 2011.

International flight and maritime operations can continue normally into and out of Japan's major airports and sea ports, excluding those damaged by the tsunami, according to the latest information available from the World Health Organization, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the World Meteorological Organization, the International Maritime Organization and the International Civil Aviation Organization.

While there is currently no medical basis for imposing restrictions, the United Nations organizations are monitoring the situation closely and will advise of any changes.

Screening for radiation of international passengers from Japan is not considered necessary at this time.

Currently available information indicates that increased levels have been detected at some airports, but these do not represent any health risk.

Further information is available on the website of the World Health Organization: http://www.who.int/en/


Link to ICAO Press Release
Representing the Six relevant United Nations specialized agencies, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) issued the following statement titled “CURRENT RADIATION LEVELS IN JAPAN AND TRAVEL ADVICE” on 1 April 2011.

Radioactive material from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi plant is gradually spreading outside Japan into the global atmosphere but at extremely low concentrations that do not present health or transportation safety hazards, according to the United Nations organizations closely monitoring the situation.

Japanese authorities confirm that all airports in the country, with the exception of Sendai which was affected by the tsunami of 11 March, continue to operate normally for both international and domestic operations. Continuous monitoring around these airports confirms that radiation levels are well within safe limits from a health perspective.

For updates, travelers visiting Japan by air are advised to consult a dedicated website established by the Japanese Civil Aviation Bureau: http://www.mlit.go.jp/koku/flyjapan_en/

Japanese authorities also confirm that all international seaports not damaged by the earthquake and tsunami are operating normally and that no health risk has been detected around the ports, based on the results of measurements of radiation levels by local governments.

Further information covering all aspects of the response of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism of Japan, as well as information regarding the radiation dose in Tokyo Bay can be found on the following websites:http://www.mlit.go.jp/page/kanbo01_hy_001411.html, http://www.mlit.go.jp/kowan/kowan_fr1_000041.html

Screening for radiation of passengers arriving from Japan is currently considered unnecessary at airports or seaports around the world.

The UN agencies involved in the monitoring process are the World Health Organization, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the World Meteorological Organization, the International Maritime Organization, the International Civil Aviation Organization and the World Tourism Organization.

Further information is available on the website of the World Health Organization: http://www.who.int/en/and ICAO Newsroom: http://www2.icao.int/en/newsroom/default.aspx


Link to ICAO Press Release
Representing the seven relevant United Nations specialized agencies, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) issued the following statement titled “CURRENT SITUATION FOR TRAVEL AND TRANSPORT TO AND FROM JAPAN” on 14 April 2011.

The United Nations organizations closely monitoring the effects of the damaged Fukushima Daiichi plant remain confident that current radiation levels do not present health or transportation safety hazards to passengers and crew.

On 18 March, based on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES)*, the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry assessed the significance rating of the accident at the plant as Level 5. On 12 April, this assessment was revised to Level 7 following information obtained from estimations of the amount of radioactive material discharged to the atmosphere.

Radiation monitoring around airports and seaports in Japan continues to confirm that levels remain well within safe limits from a health perspective. In addition, monitoring of passengers, crew and cargo from Japan carried out to date in other countries, in accordance with their national policy, does not suggest any health or safety risk. Therefore, screening of radiation for health and safety purposes is currently considered unnecessary at airports and seaports around the world.

*Information concerning travel and transport to and from Japan by air or sea is not dependent on the INES rating.

For updates, travelers visiting Japan by air are advised to consult a dedicated website established by the Japanese Civil Aviation Bureau:

http://www.mlit.go.jp/koku/flyjapan_en/ .

Further information covering all aspects of the response of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism of Japan, as well as information regarding the radiation dose in Tokyo Bay and at sea in the region can be found on the following websites:

http://www.mlit.go.jp/page/kanbo01_hy_001411.html/
http://www.mlit.go.jp/kowan/kowan_fr1_000041.html
http://www.mlit.go.jp/en/maritime/maritime_fr1_000007.html

The UN agencies involved in the monitoring process are the World Health Organization, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the World Meteorological Organization, the International Maritime Organization, the International Civil Aviation Organization, the World Tourism Organization and the International Labour Organization.

Further information concerning health aspects is available on the website of the World Health Organization - www.who.int


Link to ICAO Press Release

(2)International Air Transport Association (IATA)

Representing major airlines of the world, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) issued the following statement, fully supporting the ICAO’s message, on 19 March 2011.


The International Air Transport Association (IATA) welcomed the joint statement issued by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) on behalf of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), International Maritime Organization (IMO), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), on the continued safety of air transport operations in Japan. These five organizations confirmed that there are no restrictions to normal air transport operations at Japan’s major airports, including both Haneda and Narita.

“Safety is our number one priority. If it is not safe, we won’t fly. Today’s joint statement by the five most authoritative United Nations (UN) organizations on air transport, nuclear energy, shipping, health and weather confirms that it is safe to operate in Japan,” said Giovanni Bisignani, IATA’s Director General and CEO.

The ICAO statement further confirmed that there are no health reasons that would require the screening of passengers emanating from Japan. Moreover the Organizations confirmed that there is no health risk associated with increased levels of radiation that have been detected at some airports. Although not recommended by the UN organizations, several states are implementing screening programs for passengers and flights from Japan. As these measures are not being coordinated among governments, IATA is tracking developments at www.iata.org/japan-measures.

“The combination of crises impacting Japan today is unprecedented. But global standards and best practices exist to protect the safety of all concerned. We must follow the joint advice of these authoritative global bodies to provide the best advice to the industry, its employees, travelers and shippers. The situation is evolving quickly and is being constantly monitored. Today the advice is that normal operations are possible. If the advice changes, the industry will comply and transparently keep all informed of the developments,” said Bisignani

“Effective air links are critically important at this time. Our members are rising to the challenge of bringing relief supplies, equipment and people to Japan as well as connecting families affected by this tragedy,” said Bisignani.


Link to IATA Press Release

Representing major airlines of the world, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) issued the following statement, fully supporting the ICAO’s message, on 1 April 2011.


The International Air Transport Association (IATA) welcomed confirmation from six United Nations (UN) agencies monitoring Japan’s damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant that there is no health or transportation safety hazard. The UN statement also confirmed that screening for radiation of passengers arriving from Japan is currently considered unnecessary at airports or seaports around the world.

The joint statement was prepared by the World Health Organization, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the World Meteorological Organization, the International Maritime Organization, the International Civil Aviation Organization and the World Tourism Organization.

According to the UN statement, continuous monitoring around Japan’s airports confirms that radiation levels are well within safe limits from a health perspective. For updates, travelers visiting Japan by air are advised to consult a dedicated website established by the Japanese Civil Aviation Bureau:http://www.mlit.go.jp/koku/flyjapan_en/

“Safety is always the top priority. The transparent and continuous monitoring of the situation has allowed Japanese and international authorities to confirm that Japan’s airports remain open and safe for travelers and transport workers. It is important that governments and industry respond to the challenges of this crisis with best practices supported by expert advice. We are reassured that the UN is not recommending screening measures for passengers coming from Japan,” said Giovanni Bisignani, IATA’s Director General and CEO.


Link to IATA Press Release

(3)International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

Fukushima Nuclear Accident Update Log (website)

(4)World Health Organization (WHO)

“WHO is not advising general restrictions on travel to Japan” (FAQs on 21 March 2011)

(5)International Maritime Organization (IMO)

“No Restrictions on Travel to Japan”(News release:21 March 2011)
The following companies and organizations have delivered important messages to us.

(1)Delta Air Lines (USA)

Mr. Richard Anderson, CEO, on his courtesy call on MLIT, 24 March 2011

Japan is an important market, therefore, no major schedule changes are planned; however, some adjustments will be made to consolidate resources and to account for the drop in demand.
The main purpose of the visit is to meet with employees and see how they are doing along with checking on our operations, which have recovered. NRT is organized.
Safety is the number one priority for Delta and that would never be jeopardized. Numerous organizations have continued to highlight it is safe to travel.
Delta is and will continue to support Japan during this crisis.

(2)International Airlines Group (IAG) - the holding company of British Airways (UK)

Mr. Willie Walsh, CEO, on his courtesy call on MLIT, 28 March 2011

I came to Japan to see the progress of recovery after the earthquake and to see the current situation in Tokyo. I am very impressed with the speed of recovery and the level of engineering in Japan. Once again, Tokyo feels like a safe place to visit.
With this experience of mine, we intend to continue flying to Narita and to resume direct flights to Haneda as soon as possible.
We would like to help Japan continue its recovery in any way we can.

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