Title Niōmon Gate and Statues of the Deva Kings

  • Hyogo
Topic(s):
Shrines/Temples/Churches Public Works & Institutions (Museums, etc.)
Medium/Media of Use:
Interpretive Sign
Text Length:
≤250 Words
FY Prepared:
2020
Associated Tourism Board:
shoshazan engyoji kankoshinkokyogikai
Associated Address:
2968, Shosha, Himeji-shi , Hyogo

仁王門と金剛力士像

仁王門は圓教寺の正面玄関である。書寫山の東端にあるメインルートの終点に位置し、寺院の神聖な領域と外の俗世の間の象徴的な分かれ目を示しています。仁王門は間口三間幅、奥行き二間(三間一戸の八脚門)、古典的な建築様式である。外側から眺めると、瓦葺き屋根には中央に一層の大屋根が見られる。しかし参拝者は、その下から、2つの三角錐の補助屋根が隠れているのを見ることができる。この独特な設計は「三棟造り」と呼ばれ、東大寺や法隆寺など、日本最古の寺院のいくつかにだけ見られる様式である。

門の両側には二つの部屋がある。それらの中には、右に那羅延金剛像(ならえんこんごう)、左に密迹金剛像(みっしゃくこんごう)が安置されている。これらの金剛力士像は、筋肉隆々激しい表情で、仏法を守護し、外敵を追い払うために十分な大きさである。この二体の像は、「阿」と「吽」と呼ばれている。その由来は、サンスクリット語のアルファベットの最初と最後の文字に由来している。ちょうど古代ギリシャ語のアルファとオメガの概念の如く、「始まりと終わり」を意味し、普遍性と全能性を象徴している。また「金剛力士」としても知られ、この善の神が東南アジアのお寺の門を守っている姿はよく見られる。


Niōmon Gate and Statues of the Deva Kings

The Niōmon Gate is the main entrance to Engyōji. Located at the end of the main route to the temple on the mountain’s eastern side, it marks the symbolic divide between the sacred realm of the temple and the secular world outside. Three bays wide and two bays deep, the gate follows a classical architectural model: when viewed from the outside, the tiled roof has a single central ridge line. From beneath, however, visitors can see two triangular sub-ridges tucked snugly inside the roof. This unusual design feature, called “triple ridges” (mitsumune-zukuri), is found only at several of the oldest temples in Japan, including Tōdaiji and Hōryūji.

Two chambers are located on either side of the gate. Inside are statues of the deva kings Naraen Kongō-ō (right) and Misshaku Kongō-ō (left). Rippling with muscle and bearing fierce expressions, these deities use their impressive size and strength to uphold Buddhist teachings and to frighten away ignorance. These statues are referred to as “Ah” and “Om.” These names are taken from the first and last letters of the Sanskrit alphabet. Like the classical Greek notion of Alpha and Omega, they refer to “the beginning and the end” and symbolize universality and omnipotence. Also known as the Guardians of the Diamond Realm (Kongō-rikishi), the deva kings often guard the gates of temples throughout East Asia.


Search